March 5, 2021

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Two sea turtles released in Arecibo | PRESENT


The Caribbean Manatee Conservation Center reported through its social networks about the release of sea turtles on September 2, on a beach located in Arecibo.

Chely and Kai were rescued by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources and the environmental organization Yo Amo el Tinglar. Similarly, rehabilitated by the Caribbean Manatee Conservation Center of the Bayamón Campus of the Inter-American University of Puerto Rico.

TWO SEA TURTLES RELEASED IN PUERTO RICO Two specimens of sea turtles were released to the sea today, September 2 after being rescued by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources and the environmental organization Yo Amo el Tinglar, and rehabilitated by the Conservation Center of Manatees of the Caribbean of the Bayamón Campus of the Interamerican University of Puerto Rico. Chely and Kai were returned to their natural habitat in a selected space on a beach located in Arecibo. Both species, Chelonia mydas (whitefish) and Eretmochelys imbricata (hawksbill), respectively and in danger of extinction, will be fitted with a satellite transmitter to monitor their post-rehabilitation movements. On a daily basis, technicians from the Center will follow their swimming and location via satellite ARGOS through a special computer at the Inter-American University. Chely was struck by a boat in Arecibo in 2018, which entailed a recovery time of two years. Kai lost her left pectoral fin on Culebra Island in June 2020 due to being entangled with discarded fishing line in the sea and was found by some young people who reported their finding. Her recovery took two months. Veterinary treatment of both turtles was in charge of veterinarians Antonio L. Rivera, Lesly Cabrias and Ricardo Fernández. “This collaborative work between the third sector, academia and government agencies is of utmost importance for the conservation of these endangered species,” said the veterinary technician and director of the Center, Dr. Antonio Mignucci. “Each individual of these species is important for the survival of the species, particularly these two turtles that are female, and hopefully they will one day be able to spawn on our coasts,” added the professor of marine sciences at Inter. Sea turtles have played a vital role in maintaining the health of the world’s oceans for more than 100 million years. Their functions range from the productive maintenance of coral reef ecosystems to the transport of essential nutrients from the oceans to beaches and coastal dunes. There have been important changes in the oceans, among them that sea turtles have been practically eliminated from many areas of the world. Direct hunting for meat and jewelry from their shells, loss of their nesting habitat, and climate change are several of the human-caused threats that have driven sea turtles onto the path of extinction. As sea turtle populations are in decline, so is their ability to fulfill the vital functions of ocean ecosystems. The Manatee Conservation Center’s rescue, veterinary care and rehabilitation programs run under permits and in collaboration with the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The Center not only provides care and treatment to the mammals that give its name, but also cares for other marine animals such as dolphins, sea turtles, pelicans and seagulls in Puerto Rico and other Caribbean countries. Under the authority of PRDNER # 2019-EPE-020 Endangered Species Scientific Permit

published by Caribbean Manatee Conservation Center on Wednesday, September 2, 2020

As reported, both species, Chelonia mydas (whitefish) and Eretmochelys imbricata (hawksbill), respectively and in danger of extinction, will be fitted with a satellite transmitter to monitor their post-rehabilitation movements, and daily technicians from the Center will follow their swims. and ARGOS satellite location through a special computer at INTER.

Chely was hit by a boat in Arecibo in 2018, which took a two-year recovery time.

For his part, Kai lost his left pectoral fin on the Island of Culebra in June 2020 because it was entangled with discarded fishing line in the sea and was found by some young people who reported their finding. Her recovery took two months. Veterinary treatment of both turtles was in charge of veterinarians Antonio L. Rivera, Lesly Cabrias and Ricardo Fernández.

“This collaborative work between the third sector, academia and government agencies is of utmost importance for the conservation of these endangered species,” said the veterinary technician and director of the Center, Dr. Antonio Mignucci.

“Each individual of these species is important for the survival of the species, particularly these two turtles that are female, and hopefully they will one day be able to spawn on our coasts,” added the professor of marine science at Inter.

Sea turtles have played a vital role in maintaining the health of the world’s oceans for more than 100 million years. Their functions range from the productive maintenance of coral reef ecosystems to the transport of essential nutrients from the oceans to beaches and coastal dunes.



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